Law Offices of Matthew S. Schultz, P.C.
480-900-6032

November 2018 Archives

Dividing a 401(k) in an Arizona divorce

When Arizona couples decide to end their marriage, their retirement funds are often among the largest assets that they own. Going through a divorce is often financially difficult, but people can take action to help protect their financial future and move forward after the split. While Arizona is a community property state, meaning that assets obtained during the marriage belong equally to both parties, judges do have discretion in some cases.

Birdnesting and other ways to help children adjust after divorce

Some divorced parents in Arizona might choose a custody arrangement that is sometimes called "birdnesting." This means that the children remain at home while the parents take turns living there. The parents usually also take turns sharing a small apartment elsewhere. The main advantage of birdnesting is that it gives children a period of time where there is minimal upheaval in their lives, allowing them to better adjust to the divorce.

Joint child custody offers some benefits

If you would like to divorce your spouse and you share young children, child custody will no doubt be one of your biggest areas of focus. Will the children end up living with the other party? If so, will you have the opportunity to visit the children often? Or can you both share custody of your children?

Family court challenges after a divorce

Many Arizona parents may face a difficult time during a divorce, often because the split nearly always means a reduction in time spent with the children. While some divorcing parents are able to reach an amicable conclusion that shares parenting time, others have a more difficult or volatile relationship that can devolve into a drawn-out custody battle in court. When the latter situation happens, both parents may feel as if they were treated unfairly in family court.

Child support payments don't last indefinitely

As a general rule, Arizona parents are required to provide financial assistance to their children. If parents get divorced, one will usually pay child support to the other even if no one has asked for it. There are also scenarios in which a parent may ask that support payments be stopped after an order is entered. This could occur if the custodial parent gets a raise at work or receives a large inheritance.

States address immigrant children whose parents are deported

With immigration arrests and deportations in Arizona and throughout the country on the rise, the number of children who remain in the United States after their parents are deported is also rising. Of children whose grandparents or other family members are raising them, 20 percent are in immigrant households.

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Law Offices of Matthew S. Schultz

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